Forced Perspective / Optical Illusion Photography Tips

May 26, 2015  •  Leave a Comment
 


 


 

iPhone Cell camera DSLR & SLR Camera Tricks -- Forced Perspective / Optical Illusion Photography
 

Photo courtesy of Jonathan Cobb
 


 


 


 


 


 

Photo courtesy of Jonathan Cobb
 

We have all seen those photographs of travelers holding up the leaning tower or people holding our sun between their thumb and forefinger. There is a name for this -- they are using the Forced Perspective Technique. My interpretation of the science behind it is simply this -- human depth perception is possible because we have two eyes which naturally work together to communnicate depth to our brains. Unlike our eyes, the camera has only one lens which allows us to control the depth of field and makes illusions like this possible.
 

I've been photographing things since early 2012, took some online lessons and joined a few film photography classes at a local community college -- Today I share some tips that have helped my partner and I create some pretty fun optical illusion photographs:
 

- Take your time and think about the outcome you're trying to achieve. If you're using a camera phone or point and shoot then just line things up, snap & share
 

- A DSLR will allow you more control. If using one of these I would strongly suggest using a tripod and change your settings to either Aperture priority or manual mode to be sure your camera does not auto adjust your settings.
 

- Choose a tiny aperture, when possible I like to use f 22.
 

- To make smaller objects look larger than life: move them closest to your camera and set the larger ones farther back. For example in the photo above the large car is in the background and the small child is very close.The photo above is a great example of forced perspective. Forced perspective is nothing more than an optical illusion which fools our minds into preceiving objects differently than they actually are. Forced perspective leads the viewer to assume something is bigger, smaller, closer or farther than it really is. This technique is very common in photography and just another reason I love photography so much
 


 

Thanks for Visiting!! I'd love to hear from you -- leave your photography tips or suggestions in the comments box below or drop a link to your website or page 💕
 


 

Your Friend,
 

Laura
 

 

 


 

 

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